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watershed

The expanse of land which sends runoff into a common waterbody

NDEP Truckee River Monitoring Project

Summary: 
Nevada Division of Environmental Protection maintains a monitoring program throughout the state, including the Truckee River watershed. Find descriptions of the program at this link: http://truckeeriverinfo.org/project/ndep-truckee-river-monitoring-project - and dataset below. Further data may be found in the State's STORET database.
Rights: 
Creative Commons - Commercial Use OK
Status: 
Ongoing
Date Range: 
2016-01-13

Nevada Division of Environmental Protection maintains a monitoring program throughout the state, including the Truckee River watershed. Find descriptions of the program at this link: http://truckeeriverinfo.org/project/ndep-truckee-river-monitoring-project.

and the most current dataset is below. Further data may be found in the State's STORET database.

Nevada 2012 Water Quality Integrated Report (final draft)

Summary: 
The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection is required by the Clean Water Act to conduct a comprehensive analysis of water quality data associated with Nevada's surface waters to determine whether state water quality standards are being met and designated uses are being supported. This integrated report provides snapshot conditions of all waters in the state of Nevada, impaired or otherwise.
Primary Contact: 
Rights: 
Creative Commons - Commercial Use OK
Status: 
Ongoing
Date Range: 
2014-04-07

The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection is required by the Clean Water Act to
conduct a comprehensive analysis of water quality data associated with Nevada's surface
waters to determine whether state water quality standards are being met and designated
uses are being supported. Nevada’s Integrated Report is prepared in accordance with the
requirements of Sections 303(d)/305(b)/314 of the Clean Water Act and is intended for use
by the public, other entities and NDEP for water quality management planning purposes.
The Nevada 2012 Integrated Report evaluates data collected over a 5 year period, between
October 1, 2006 and September 30, 2011.

The Nevada 2012 Integrated Report has been submitted to the United States Environmental
Protection Agency for approval, as of April 7, 2014.

The Nevada 2012 Integrated Report is available at:
http://ndep.nv.gov/bwqp/303dlist2012.htm

If you have any questions, please contact:

John Heggeness

Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe Non Point Source Assessment

Summary: 
This draft NPS Assessment Report provides a view of current conditions and considers those best management practices (BMPs) which might prove applicable to the pollution concerns on the reservation. Feedback will be sought until publication of the report is made, expected sometime in late 2013.
Primary Contact: 
Rights: 
Creative Commons - Commercial Use OK
Status: 
Ongoing
Date Range: 
2013-11-01

Located in a rural area that is approximately 35 miles northeast of the city of Reno, Nevada, the reservation of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe contains 477,000 acres and one of the world’s most beautiful desert terminus lakes. Non-point source pollution (water degradation by a mobile, random, or large-scale source) is a concern for the Tribe, and subsequent to a large planning effort in 1994, current pollution issues have been studied and categorized in new ways. While many kinds of waters exist on the reservation, current needs have been identified for Pyramid Lake, the Truckee River, and for perennial streams in the tribal reservation mountains. Even after years of research, more water quality questions remain to be investigated. The draft NPS Assessment Report provides a view of current conditions and considers those best management pracictes (BMPs) which might prove applicable to the pollution concerns on the reservation.

Tahoe-Pyramid Bikeway Map 2013

Summary: 
Janet Carson of the Tahoe-Pyramid Bikeway has worked with other community members for years to gain precious access to trails/ making connectivity happen along the mainstem Truckee. This website has a map of the open reaches, and those yet to come.
Primary Contact: 
Rights: 
Creative Commons - Commercial Use OK
Status: 
Ongoing
Date Range: 
2013-07-23

Steamboat Creek Watershed

Summary: 
General map depicting the watershed boundary for Steamboat Creek (approximately 216 mi²).
Primary Contact: 
Rights: 
Public Domain
Status: 
Completed
Date Range: 
2010-06-21

This map was created in support of the Washoe-Storey Conservation District Steamboat Creek Restoration Plan and the continued efforts toward project implementation.

Alum Creek Research Project

Summary: 
Mark Walker's Ecohydrology class studied Alum Creek as part of their class. The powerpoint they showed to the Truckee Meadows Watershed Committee is attached, describing their study and results.
Primary Contact: 
Rights: 
Creative Commons - Commercial Use OK
Status: 
Ongoing
Contributors: 
Date Range: 
2010-02-09

Contact for this study: Mark Walker, Ph.D., Professor/Researcher UNCE / UNR: (775) 784-1938

Experts to discuss polluted Chalk Creek

Experts to discuss polluted Chalk Creek
By Jeff DeLong • jdelong@rgj.com • November 14, 2009

Experts will outline plans for Chalk Creek, a tributary of the Truckee River, and discuss ways residents and businesses in the area are contributing to its pollution with everyday practices described as "urban slobber."

Chalk Creek winds about 5 miles from the flanks of Peavine Peak through northwest Reno neighborhoods before entering the river.

Along the way, it picks up dense concentrations of salts and algae nutrients, the result of overwatering of lawns, heavy fertilizing, washing cars on driveways and similar practices, said Lynell Garfield, a hydrologist for the city of Reno.

It's caused Chalk Creek to become one of the region's more polluted streams, tainting quality of Truckee River water that provides 80 percent of the area's water supply.

"If we don't look at the source, we're never going to clean up that creek," said Garfield, who will explain plans to clean up the creek, such as creating a wetlands near Rainbow Ridge Park to help naturally filter creek water.

Cleaning the creek
Officials said residents must make some changes for the effort to clean Chalk Creek to succeed:
Do not overwater and let irrigation water run into storm drains.
Conserve water through drip irrigation, use of soaker hoses, microspray systems and nozzles when washing cars.
Do not over fertilize and never fertilize near ditches, streams over other water bodies.
Store pesticides, fertilizers and other chemicals in a covered area.
Use nontoxic, alternative pest control.

If you go
What: Chalk Creek outreach meeting.
Where: Northwest Reno library, 2325 Robb Drive.
When: 5:30 p.m. Tuesday
To learn more: www.tmstormwater.com,
www.tmwalandscapeguide.com.

Meeting will look at how to keep urban slobber out of northwest Reno stream

By Jeff DeLong • jdelong@rgj.com • November 13, 2009

Experts will outline plans for Chalk Creek, a tributary of the Truckee River, and discuss ways residents and businesses in the area are contributing to its pollution with everyday practices described as “urban slobber.”

Chalk Creek winds about 5 miles from the flanks of Peavine Peak through northwest Reno neighborhoods before entering the Truckee River.

Along the way, it picks up dense concentrations of salts and algae nutrients, the result of overwatering of lawns, heavy fertilizing, washing cars on driveways and similar practices, said Lynell Garfield, a hydrologist for the city of Reno.

It’s caused Chalk Creek to become one of the region’s more polluted streams, tainting quality of Truckee River water that provides 80 percent of the area’s water supply.

“If we don’t look at the source, we’re never going to clean up that creek,” said Garfield, who will explain plans to clean up the creek, such as creating a wetlands near Rainbow Ridge Park to help naturally filter creek water.

Officials say residents must make some changes for the effort to succeed:

Do not over water and let irrigation water run into storm drains.
Conserve water through drip irrigation, use of soaker hoses, micro-spray systems and nozzles when washing cars.
Do not over fertilize and never fertilize near ditches, streams over other water bodies.
Store pesticides, fertilizers and other chemicals in a covered area.
Use non-toxic, alternative pest control.

Lower Truckee River Bioassessment Symposium - 2009. #3

Summary: 
NDEP presents: the LTR Bioassessment Symposium, held at DRI on January 5-6, 2009.
Primary Contact: 
Rights: 
Creative Commons - Commercial Use OK
Status: 
Ongoing

NDEP presents: the LTR Bioassessment Symposium, held at DRI on January 5-6, 2009. Click on title for expanded view; please find the last Day One power points and first Day Two power point presentations attached and available for download below, including those by Condon, Henderson, Swanson on Cottonwoods, Flood Project, and Lotic Assessments respectively.

Volunteers try to clean Storey County homeless camps

By Susan Voyles, Reno Gazzette-Journal
February 5, 2009

Where the Truckee River bike trail ends in east Sparks, homeless people follow a dirt road along the river, cross a railroad bridge and follow the historic Pioneer Trail to well-worn side trails to a dozen or so camps built high in the canyons in Storey County.

Cardwell, a retired Reno police lieutenant, Reno firefighter Pat Kleames and a few of their friends cleared five shopping carts and a pickup load of trash two weeks ago at the start of the trail.

But in a tour they led Wednesday, there were beer bottles, clothes and other trash scattered along the trail in the first canyon east of the Reno-Sparks sewer plant. A thick pile of tumbleweeds hid a tent at the mouth of the canyon. Up in that canyon, Jim, 56, a laid-off Reno casino cook, lives among rats at a makeshift home next to a sizeable garbage heap. Buckets of human excrement were 20 to 30 foot steps below the cabin in the steep ravine.

Inside, his shack was warm and tidy.

"I'm fixing it up as best I can," he said. "There's rats all over the place. I'm trying to get rid of them."

Jim said he's been watching the place for a week or so for a friend who had lived there a couple of years. If he has to move, he said he'd find other places along the Truckee River in Reno or Sparks. He doesn't like homeless shelters because he's afraid of getting sick.

Cardwell, a 35-year Reno police officer, said the outdoor camp was by far the worst he has seen.

"The trash is unbelievable," he said. Cardwell has asked Storey County officials to close the camps and is offering to lead a group of volunteers to clean up the mess.

"My sons came out here to hike these canyons," Kleames said. "No kids should be out here now."

For entire story, please visit website.

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